Beauty Secrets of Iceland 
We all know the nature in Iceland is pretty amazing to look at. But that’s not all; it seems to rub off on the people. It’s no coincidence that Icelanders have glowing skin and a longer than average life expectancy. It’s all about living in nature and using it to their advantage to keep healthy. So how exactly do they do it?
Icelanders are famous for their love of outdoor bathing regardless of the season and most like to take a dip every morning. Bracing. It may sound like a struggle to plunge your body into a pool of water when the air around is icy cold but once you’re immersed the benefits are indeed very impressive. The minerals are like food for your skin and have anti-inflammatory properties, sinking in through the hot water and nourishing and relieving skin cells.
It’s not just skin that enjoys a geothermal soak; many don’t realise that the contrast of being immersed in hot water whilst breathing in ice cold air is really good for your heart and lungs and a soak in the hot water is great for joints and muscles as well as relieving stress. Talk about multi-tasking. In Iceland both young and old use the geothermal pools and they are known to heal a whole range of ailments. The best and most secluded hot springs and pools are found in the highlands or remote fjords and are free for anyone to use. A couple of the most delightfully restful and secluded are Strutslaug North of Myrdalsjokull and the Snorralaug hot spring which also happens to be the oldest known Icelandic thermal pool.
It’s not all about the water though. A must have beauty treatment in Iceland is the algae wrap which starts off with a mineral salt massage to exfoliate after which you are entirely wrapped in algae to nourish skin. Research has proven that algae has remarkable anti-ageing effects which is an added bonus. The Silica mud massage is another natural Icelandic wonder which exfoliates and energizes giving skin a glow and strengthening its upper layer. Both algae and silica can be found along with lots of minerals in the mud at the bottom of the Blue Lagoon so you can slather it all over your skin whilst you’re floating serenely in the water.
So, whether hidden in the mud at the bottom of a geothermal pool or tucked away in a desolate fjord, there are many natural beauty secrets and treatments unique to Iceland. If you want a tastes of a real Icelander’s wisdom get involved with Inspired by Iceland and visit InspiredbyIceland.com to get your invite to the ultimate relaxing beauty experiences. You can spend a day at a geothermal pool in the beautiful fishing town of Hofn with a local who knows all about the surrounding area and the best places to go. Or why not visit the Westfjords, Iceland’s most sparsely populated region, and get to experience three hot springs in one day with Icelandic local Siggi? Don’t forget to check out what other invites are available and get more information on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Camera: Phase One P 45+
  • Aperture: f/11
  • Exposure: 1/125th
  • Focal Length: 35mm

Beauty Secrets of Iceland 

We all know the nature in Iceland is pretty amazing to look at. But that’s not all; it seems to rub off on the people. It’s no coincidence that Icelanders have glowing skin and a longer than average life expectancy. It’s all about living in nature and using it to their advantage to keep healthy. So how exactly do they do it?

Icelanders are famous for their love of outdoor bathing regardless of the season and most like to take a dip every morning. Bracing. It may sound like a struggle to plunge your body into a pool of water when the air around is icy cold but once you’re immersed the benefits are indeed very impressive. The minerals are like food for your skin and have anti-inflammatory properties, sinking in through the hot water and nourishing and relieving skin cells.

It’s not just skin that enjoys a geothermal soak; many don’t realise that the contrast of being immersed in hot water whilst breathing in ice cold air is really good for your heart and lungs and a soak in the hot water is great for joints and muscles as well as relieving stress. Talk about multi-tasking. In Iceland both young and old use the geothermal pools and they are known to heal a whole range of ailments. The best and most secluded hot springs and pools are found in the highlands or remote fjords and are free for anyone to use. A couple of the most delightfully restful and secluded are Strutslaug North of Myrdalsjokull and the Snorralaug hot spring which also happens to be the oldest known Icelandic thermal pool.

It’s not all about the water though. A must have beauty treatment in Iceland is the algae wrap which starts off with a mineral salt massage to exfoliate after which you are entirely wrapped in algae to nourish skin. Research has proven that algae has remarkable anti-ageing effects which is an added bonus. The Silica mud massage is another natural Icelandic wonder which exfoliates and energizes giving skin a glow and strengthening its upper layer. Both algae and silica can be found along with lots of minerals in the mud at the bottom of the Blue Lagoon so you can slather it all over your skin whilst you’re floating serenely in the water.

So, whether hidden in the mud at the bottom of a geothermal pool or tucked away in a desolate fjord, there are many natural beauty secrets and treatments unique to Iceland. If you want a tastes of a real Icelander’s wisdom get involved with Inspired by Iceland and visit InspiredbyIceland.com to get your invite to the ultimate relaxing beauty experiences. You can spend a day at a geothermal pool in the beautiful fishing town of Hofn with a local who knows all about the surrounding area and the best places to go. Or why not visit the Westfjords, Iceland’s most sparsely populated region, and get to experience three hot springs in one day with Icelandic local Siggi? Don’t forget to check out what other invites are available and get more information on Facebook and Twitter.