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  • Feb 21

    Eldhús: Iceland’s Little House of Food

    Inspired by Iceland is taking the dining experience to a whole new level with Eldhús a pop-up food experience on wheels which will be travelling across the most remote and extreme areas of Iceland seeking out the best of Icelandic cuisine. Eldhús is an Icelandic word meaning kitchen. Literary, it means house of fire, referring to the part of an house where the open fire would be kept alive for cooking, before the days of metal stoves.

    This tasty 12-day expedition through Icelandic gastronomy runs from the 7th to the 18th March and will see Eldhús braving frozen glaciers and volcanic terrain, teetering along mountain paths and stopping off at Iceland’s most extreme beauty spots for tips and native delicacies from local farmers and fisherman.

    This little feast of delights is being built completely from scratch and will accommodate everything from Grandma’s favourite recipes to Iceland’s most cutting edge gastronomy. Obviously so much good food requires great cooks and very soon we will be starting the search for Iceland’s most inspiring and talented food moguls to take part in the 12-day food journey.

    Through the Inspired by Iceland communities on Facebook and Twitter we will invite the people of Iceland to nominate themselves or the people they know to take on the role of chef for one night. Visitors to Iceland eating at Eldhús will be lucky enough to be dined by these winning chefs. We’ll be selecting our cooks by asking them what Icelandic dishes they would love to rustle up for the guests. Keep an eye out for more details to follow very soon.

    If you’d be happier eating the food rather than cooking it then come back soon for more information on how to register for the chance to eat in Eldhús on selected nights over its journey from 7th to 18th March.

  • Nov 30
    There is something “Christmassy” in this photo, right? 
northisstraightahead:

Cold but peaceful. by Ingólfur, on Flickr
Lake Úlfljótsvatn, Iceland

    There is something “Christmassy” in this photo, right? 

    northisstraightahead:

    Cold but peaceful. by Ingólfur, on Flickr

    Lake Úlfljótsvatn, Iceland

  • Nov 30
    Beauty Secrets of Iceland 
We all know the nature in Iceland is pretty amazing to look at. But that’s not all; it seems to rub off on the people. It’s no coincidence that Icelanders have glowing skin and a longer than average life expectancy. It’s all about living in nature and using it to their advantage to keep healthy. So how exactly do they do it?
Icelanders are famous for their love of outdoor bathing regardless of the season and most like to take a dip every morning. Bracing. It may sound like a struggle to plunge your body into a pool of water when the air around is icy cold but once you’re immersed the benefits are indeed very impressive. The minerals are like food for your skin and have anti-inflammatory properties, sinking in through the hot water and nourishing and relieving skin cells.
It’s not just skin that enjoys a geothermal soak; many don’t realise that the contrast of being immersed in hot water whilst breathing in ice cold air is really good for your heart and lungs and a soak in the hot water is great for joints and muscles as well as relieving stress. Talk about multi-tasking. In Iceland both young and old use the geothermal pools and they are known to heal a whole range of ailments. The best and most secluded hot springs and pools are found in the highlands or remote fjords and are free for anyone to use. A couple of the most delightfully restful and secluded are Strutslaug North of Myrdalsjokull and the Snorralaug hot spring which also happens to be the oldest known Icelandic thermal pool.
It’s not all about the water though. A must have beauty treatment in Iceland is the algae wrap which starts off with a mineral salt massage to exfoliate after which you are entirely wrapped in algae to nourish skin. Research has proven that algae has remarkable anti-ageing effects which is an added bonus. The Silica mud massage is another natural Icelandic wonder which exfoliates and energizes giving skin a glow and strengthening its upper layer. Both algae and silica can be found along with lots of minerals in the mud at the bottom of the Blue Lagoon so you can slather it all over your skin whilst you’re floating serenely in the water.
So, whether hidden in the mud at the bottom of a geothermal pool or tucked away in a desolate fjord, there are many natural beauty secrets and treatments unique to Iceland. If you want a tastes of a real Icelander’s wisdom get involved with Inspired by Iceland and visit InspiredbyIceland.com to get your invite to the ultimate relaxing beauty experiences. You can spend a day at a geothermal pool in the beautiful fishing town of Hofn with a local who knows all about the surrounding area and the best places to go. Or why not visit the Westfjords, Iceland’s most sparsely populated region, and get to experience three hot springs in one day with Icelandic local Siggi? Don’t forget to check out what other invites are available and get more information on Facebook and Twitter.

    Beauty Secrets of Iceland 

    We all know the nature in Iceland is pretty amazing to look at. But that’s not all; it seems to rub off on the people. It’s no coincidence that Icelanders have glowing skin and a longer than average life expectancy. It’s all about living in nature and using it to their advantage to keep healthy. So how exactly do they do it?

    Icelanders are famous for their love of outdoor bathing regardless of the season and most like to take a dip every morning. Bracing. It may sound like a struggle to plunge your body into a pool of water when the air around is icy cold but once you’re immersed the benefits are indeed very impressive. The minerals are like food for your skin and have anti-inflammatory properties, sinking in through the hot water and nourishing and relieving skin cells.

    It’s not just skin that enjoys a geothermal soak; many don’t realise that the contrast of being immersed in hot water whilst breathing in ice cold air is really good for your heart and lungs and a soak in the hot water is great for joints and muscles as well as relieving stress. Talk about multi-tasking. In Iceland both young and old use the geothermal pools and they are known to heal a whole range of ailments. The best and most secluded hot springs and pools are found in the highlands or remote fjords and are free for anyone to use. A couple of the most delightfully restful and secluded are Strutslaug North of Myrdalsjokull and the Snorralaug hot spring which also happens to be the oldest known Icelandic thermal pool.

    It’s not all about the water though. A must have beauty treatment in Iceland is the algae wrap which starts off with a mineral salt massage to exfoliate after which you are entirely wrapped in algae to nourish skin. Research has proven that algae has remarkable anti-ageing effects which is an added bonus. The Silica mud massage is another natural Icelandic wonder which exfoliates and energizes giving skin a glow and strengthening its upper layer. Both algae and silica can be found along with lots of minerals in the mud at the bottom of the Blue Lagoon so you can slather it all over your skin whilst you’re floating serenely in the water.

    So, whether hidden in the mud at the bottom of a geothermal pool or tucked away in a desolate fjord, there are many natural beauty secrets and treatments unique to Iceland. If you want a tastes of a real Icelander’s wisdom get involved with Inspired by Iceland and visit InspiredbyIceland.com to get your invite to the ultimate relaxing beauty experiences. You can spend a day at a geothermal pool in the beautiful fishing town of Hofn with a local who knows all about the surrounding area and the best places to go. Or why not visit the Westfjords, Iceland’s most sparsely populated region, and get to experience three hot springs in one day with Icelandic local Siggi? Don’t forget to check out what other invites are available and get more information on Facebook and Twitter.

  • Nov 28
    Iceland’s Top 6 Extreme Adventures
Iceland isn’t all about picturesque scenery and woolly jumpers. For those who love the ultimate challenge there are plenty of exhilarating and slightly insane ways to enjoy the outdoors…
1.       Cliff Jumping
To most people diving off a cliff would be a last resort after being chased by a large animal or an axe wielding maniac. But to all adrenaline junkies out there it’s the ultimate rush and what with the abundance of steep cliffs and tumultuous waters in Iceland it’s the perfect place to plummet from a great height. It’s common to combine a cliff dive with a white water rafting or hiking trip, just in case you needed to cram in any more extreme outdoor excitement.
2.      Kayaking
It’s safe to say that Iceland’s stormy waters are not for the faint hearted, particularly when there is nothing more between you and the North Atlantic Sea than a very small boat. If you’re up for the challenge it’s a great way to see whales and seals up close and you can even make a whole trip out of it, camping in the elements and forging on the next day. Quite an adventure! 
Here are some of the amazing photos from the kayaking experience with Icelander Siggi in Ísafjörður. Visit www.Inspiredbyiceland.com where you can find invites for the other experiences available.
3.       Hiking
If there’s one thing you can be sure of it’s that hiking in Iceland is never dull. It comes in many different guises from an extreme experience navigating across a glacier to scaling up the side of a volcano, so take your pick depending on what kind of challenge you’re yearning for. Glacier hiking requires a serious pair of crampons as the ancient glaciers are full of hidden sinkholes and ice ridges as well as volcanic ash from past eruptions. The glaciers are stunning to look at but there’s nothing like being right in the middle of one to really appreciate their awesome size and power. If it’s views you’re after it always makes things a bit more exciting if you’re surveying the landscape from the top of a volcano. Mt Hekla is Iceland’s most famous volcano as well as its second most active and for many years was believed to be the gate way to hell. Sounds like the perfect challenge.
If you’d like to experience an afternoon’s hiking Iceland style with a local just visitwww.Inspiredbyiceland.com to get your invite. You even get to warm up afterwards with a home cooked fish pan so what’s not to like?
4.      Lava Caving
If you want the ultimate natural challenge, the wild depths of Iceland’s lava fields are just what you’ve been looking for. After all, not many people can say they’ve slid through a lava tube in pitch darkness on their belly.  Iceland is riddled with these incredible hidden tunnels dripping in stalactites of hardened lava and forking off into maze upon maze of caves and tubes. Definitely not for the claustrophobic, space is often tight so protective gear is a must. But don’t lose your way- the tunnels fork into all different directions and many are over 1km long, Floki near Hafnarfjordur being one of the longest. This is a challenge deep underground that is definitely not for the faint hearted…
5.      Biking
Don’t expect a gentle cycle when in Iceland; the rough terrain of mountains, valleys and rivers make for a challenging ride. For a real test of stamina try the 1000 Rivers Road which involves a tough cycle up the mountain, countless river crossings and a descent into the steam valley with hot water rushing down the mountainside.
Or why not try a ride to the Blue Lagoon over the lunar landscape, flying over the craters and hot springs? This is the ultimate way to get the blood pumping whilst really experiencing the wild Icelandic landscape. Bonus.
6.         Outdoor Swimming  
Plunging your body into icy water in the dead of Winter is definitely not everyone’s cup of tea but it’s certainly an exhilarating experience for those who enjoy a challenge. For hardy Icelanders it’s no problem with most taking a swim every morning regardless of the season; bracing to say the least. For an icy shock try an unheated outdoor pool or if you’re feeling particularly brave (or foolish) immerse yourself in the waters of The North Atlantic.
If you’d like to take a dip in an outdoor pool like the locals you can visit www.Inspiredbyiceland.com where you can find invites for the other experiences available.
Over the next few months, www.Inspiredbyiceland.com are offering real Icelandic experiences to visitors of Iceland by asking Icelanders to open their homes. Visit the site to see what other experiences are available and follow them on Facebook and Twitter for more details. 

    Iceland’s Top 6 Extreme Adventures

    Iceland isn’t all about picturesque scenery and woolly jumpers. For those who love the ultimate challenge there are plenty of exhilarating and slightly insane ways to enjoy the outdoors…

    1.       Cliff Jumping

    To most people diving off a cliff would be a last resort after being chased by a large animal or an axe wielding maniac. But to all adrenaline junkies out there it’s the ultimate rush and what with the abundance of steep cliffs and tumultuous waters in Iceland it’s the perfect place to plummet from a great height. It’s common to combine a cliff dive with a white water rafting or hiking trip, just in case you needed to cram in any more extreme outdoor excitement.

    2.      Kayaking

    It’s safe to say that Iceland’s stormy waters are not for the faint hearted, particularly when there is nothing more between you and the North Atlantic Sea than a very small boat. If you’re up for the challenge it’s a great way to see whales and seals up close and you can even make a whole trip out of it, camping in the elements and forging on the next day. Quite an adventure! 

    Here are some of the amazing photos from the kayaking experience with Icelander Siggi in Ísafjörður. Visit www.Inspiredbyiceland.com where you can find invites for the other experiences available.

    3.       Hiking

    If there’s one thing you can be sure of it’s that hiking in Iceland is never dull. It comes in many different guises from an extreme experience navigating across a glacier to scaling up the side of a volcano, so take your pick depending on what kind of challenge you’re yearning for. Glacier hiking requires a serious pair of crampons as the ancient glaciers are full of hidden sinkholes and ice ridges as well as volcanic ash from past eruptions. The glaciers are stunning to look at but there’s nothing like being right in the middle of one to really appreciate their awesome size and power. If it’s views you’re after it always makes things a bit more exciting if you’re surveying the landscape from the top of a volcano. Mt Hekla is Iceland’s most famous volcano as well as its second most active and for many years was believed to be the gate way to hell. Sounds like the perfect challenge.

    If you’d like to experience an afternoon’s hiking Iceland style with a local just visitwww.Inspiredbyiceland.com to get your invite. You even get to warm up afterwards with a home cooked fish pan so what’s not to like?

    4.      Lava Caving

    If you want the ultimate natural challenge, the wild depths of Iceland’s lava fields are just what you’ve been looking for. After all, not many people can say they’ve slid through a lava tube in pitch darkness on their belly.  Iceland is riddled with these incredible hidden tunnels dripping in stalactites of hardened lava and forking off into maze upon maze of caves and tubes. Definitely not for the claustrophobic, space is often tight so protective gear is a must. But don’t lose your way- the tunnels fork into all different directions and many are over 1km long, Floki near Hafnarfjordur being one of the longest. This is a challenge deep underground that is definitely not for the faint hearted…

    5.      Biking

    Don’t expect a gentle cycle when in Iceland; the rough terrain of mountains, valleys and rivers make for a challenging ride. For a real test of stamina try the 1000 Rivers Road which involves a tough cycle up the mountain, countless river crossings and a descent into the steam valley with hot water rushing down the mountainside.

    Or why not try a ride to the Blue Lagoon over the lunar landscape, flying over the craters and hot springs? This is the ultimate way to get the blood pumping whilst really experiencing the wild Icelandic landscape. Bonus.

    6.         Outdoor Swimming  

    Plunging your body into icy water in the dead of Winter is definitely not everyone’s cup of tea but it’s certainly an exhilarating experience for those who enjoy a challenge. For hardy Icelanders it’s no problem with most taking a swim every morning regardless of the season; bracing to say the least. For an icy shock try an unheated outdoor pool or if you’re feeling particularly brave (or foolish) immerse yourself in the waters of The North Atlantic.

    If you’d like to take a dip in an outdoor pool like the locals you can visit www.Inspiredbyiceland.com where you can find invites for the other experiences available.

    Over the next few months, www.Inspiredbyiceland.com are offering real Icelandic experiences to visitors of Iceland by asking Icelanders to open their homes. Visit the site to see what other experiences are available and follow them on Facebook and Twitter for more details. 

  • Nov 27

    Another beautiful Iceland video. 

    (Source: ericiniceland)

  • Nov 4
    Iceland’s Top 5 Natural WondersIceland is full natural beauty from hot springs to glaciers. Here are our top 5 natural wonders of Iceland.1. Northern LightsOr the Aurora Borealis if you prefer a more scientific term for the colours that light up the sky like a neon sign. The colours we see are reflected off gas particles with gases at high altitudes resulting in reddish tones and gases lower down producing blues and purples. Science aside it really is other worldly and one of nature’s most impressive and surreal performances. The Northern lights happen all year round but can only be seen between September and April in the dark winter skies. Whether or not you see them depends very much on weather conditions but it’s worth a bit of camping out. You’ll never be impressed by a firework display ever again.2. GlaciersThe glaciers and ice caps cover over 10% of Iceland’s surface area and these great frozen rivers have carved out a unique landscape. Vatnajökull is actually the largest ice cap in Europe and Iceland’s South Coast is lined with countless glaciers.In a sea of white draped with swathes of snow you can only really appreciate the magic when you have immersed yourself in the landscape through hiking or ice climbing. Awe inspiring and so, so peaceful. Magical.3. Whale watchingMan and nature seem somewhat closer in Iceland so sighting one of the world’s biggest creatures there is rather appropriate. The chances for sightings are good what with Iceland being completely surrounded by the North Atlantic sea. The most common is the Minke whale but you can also see dolphins and porpoises which is a treat. But that’s not all; humpback whales, killer whales and sperm whales are commonly sighted making for a veritable plethora of sea mammals. There are plenty of places just a thirty minute drive from Reykjavik, (including the Old Harbour in Reykjavik itself) that are ideal for sighting these mammoth creatures. The crafts you venture out in are tiny and the only other beings you will spot are fisherman. You can also see seals out there and birds aplenty with gannets, arctic terns and puffins. 4. Geysers and hot springsYou can’t get much more of a connection with nature than witnessing water heated from the very core of the earth. In Iceland this comes in the form of hot springs and geysers due to volcanic activity under the surface of the earth. The geyser is the rather more aggressive of the two, the verb ‘geysa’ in Icelandic actually meaning ‘to gush’ which makes perfect sense seeing as geysers are rather like miniature (and slightly more watery) volcanoes. These hot springs which periodically erupt and shoot water into the air are a perfect showcase of the power and force of nature. A slightly calmer geothermal phenomenon rife throughout Iceland is the hot pool or spring which is a rather relaxing (not to mention mineral rich) bathing option even during the deep Winter freeze. A lovely gift from nature.  5. Bird CliffsThe most famous of the Icelandic bird cliffs is Latrabjarg which is not only covered in millions of birds but also marks the Western most part of Europe. That’s multi-tasking. It’s somewhat of a hero as cliffs go, providing a home for up to 40% of the world’s population of some bird species.Iceland is actually the world centre for the Atlantic Puffin population meaning there are between 8 and 10 million birds so no shortage for a good bit of ornithology. They are joined by guillemots, razorbills, gannets and arctic terns. The sea birds are incredibly beautiful to see up close and many Icelanders take this to the extreme scaling down the cliffs to get a closer look at the birds.All these natural wonders are within your reach with Inspired by Iceland which is offering real Icelandic experiences to visitors by asking Icelanders to share their homes and their lives over the next few months. For your chance to try glacier hiking with the locals, photograph the Northern Lights with a professional or bathe in a hot spring in the back garden go to Inspiredbyiceland.com to get your place. Visit the site to see what other experiences are available and follow them on Facebook and Twitter for more details.

    Iceland’s Top 5 Natural Wonders

    Iceland is full natural beauty from hot springs to glaciers. Here are our top 5 natural wonders of Iceland.


    1. Northern Lights
    Or the Aurora Borealis if you prefer a more scientific term for the colours that light up the sky like a neon sign. The colours we see are reflected off gas particles with gases at high altitudes resulting in reddish tones and gases lower down producing blues and purples. Science aside it really is other worldly and one of nature’s most impressive and surreal performances.
     
    The Northern lights happen all year round but can only be seen between September and April in the dark winter skies. Whether or not you see them depends very much on weather conditions but it’s worth a bit of camping out. You’ll never be impressed by a firework display ever again.

    2. Glaciers
    The glaciers and ice caps cover over 10% of Iceland’s surface area and these great frozen rivers have carved out a unique landscape. Vatnajökull is actually the largest ice cap in Europe and Iceland’s South Coast is lined with countless glaciers.
    In a sea of white draped with swathes of snow you can only really appreciate the magic when you have immersed yourself in the landscape through hiking or ice climbing. Awe inspiring and so, so peaceful. Magical.

    3. Whale watching
    Man and nature seem somewhat closer in Iceland so sighting one of the world’s biggest creatures there is rather appropriate. The chances for sightings are good what with Iceland being completely surrounded by the North Atlantic sea. The most common is the Minke whale but you can also see dolphins and porpoises which is a treat. But that’s not all; humpback whales, killer whales and sperm whales are commonly sighted making for a veritable plethora of sea mammals.
     
    There are plenty of places just a thirty minute drive from Reykjavik, (including the Old Harbour in Reykjavik itself) that are ideal for sighting these mammoth creatures. The crafts you venture out in are tiny and the only other beings you will spot are fisherman. You can also see seals out there and birds aplenty with gannets, arctic terns and puffins.
     
    4. Geysers and hot springs
    You can’t get much more of a connection with nature than witnessing water heated from the very core of the earth. In Iceland this comes in the form of hot springs and geysers due to volcanic activity under the surface of the earth. The geyser is the rather more aggressive of the two, the verb ‘geysa’ in Icelandic actually meaning ‘to gush’ which makes perfect sense seeing as geysers are rather like miniature (and slightly more watery) volcanoes. These hot springs which periodically erupt and shoot water into the air are a perfect showcase of the power and force of nature.
     
    A slightly calmer geothermal phenomenon rife throughout Iceland is the hot pool or spring which is a rather relaxing (not to mention mineral rich) bathing option even during the deep Winter freeze. A lovely gift from nature.
     
    5. Bird Cliffs
    The most famous of the Icelandic bird cliffs is Latrabjarg which is not only covered in millions of birds but also marks the Western most part of Europe. That’s multi-tasking. It’s somewhat of a hero as cliffs go, providing a home for up to 40% of the world’s population of some bird species.

    Iceland is actually the world centre for the Atlantic Puffin population meaning there are between 8 and 10 million birds so no shortage for a good bit of ornithology. They are joined by guillemots, razorbills, gannets and arctic terns.
     
    The sea birds are incredibly beautiful to see up close and many Icelanders take this to the extreme scaling down the cliffs to get a closer look at the birds.


    All these natural wonders are within your reach with Inspired by Iceland which is offering real Icelandic experiences to visitors by asking Icelanders to share their homes and their lives over the next few months. For your chance to try glacier hiking with the locals, photograph the Northern Lights with a professional or bathe in a hot spring in the back garden go to Inspiredbyiceland.com to get your place. Visit the site to see what other experiences are available and follow them on Facebook and Twitter for more details.

  • Oct 27
    onethirtyonedays:

A very quiet day in rainy Reykjavik where wandered into the city and enjoyed another Icelandic delicacy at Bæjarins beztu; the hotdog with no less than three sauces and two types of onions, enjoyed by Bill Clinton and is commonly said to be Iceland’s Favourite Food.

    onethirtyonedays:

    A very quiet day in rainy Reykjavik where wandered into the city and enjoyed another Icelandic delicacy at Bæjarins beztu; the hotdog with no less than three sauces and two types of onions, enjoyed by Bill Clinton and is commonly said to be Iceland’s Favourite Food.

  • Oct 24
    The invention of false advertising | Iceland - Greenland.
Little known fact: Greenland stretches further to the North, East, West and South than Iceland does.

    The invention of false advertising | Iceland - Greenland.

    Little known fact: Greenland stretches further to the North, East, West and South than Iceland does.

  • Oct 20
    acoustic-garden:

Blue Lagoon/101 Hotel…Reykjavik, Iceland

    acoustic-garden:

    Blue Lagoon/101 Hotel…
    Reykjavik, Iceland

  • Oct 11
    c0mets:

Langahlíð (by Jón Óskar.)

    c0mets:

    Langahlíð (by Jón Óskar.)

    (via )

  • Oct 10

    Icelanders Welcome Tourists Into Their Homes

    Yes, friends. You read that correctly.

    This month and next, Icelanders have joined hands to welcome tourists to the country by issuing personal invitation to guests to join them as part of daily life in Icceland. 

    Enjoy swimming in the North Atlantic Ocean with a local, or accept pancakes from the president of Iceland. The whole nation welcomes you. 

  • Oct 10

    icelandpictures:

    Eat waffles with The President of Iceland

    Now this is a campaign only accomplishable in a tiny and friendly country such as Iceland. The President of Iceland launched the campaign with an address to the nation asking them to invite foreign guests into their homes or out for some play. Icelanders are supposed to go to the Inspired by Iceland website and register their invitations which visitors can then view and select.

    Whether it is a private concert in your hotel room with one of my favorite singers Mugison, swimming in the sea with locals, learning to knit a lopapeysa, eat sushi with Jón Gnarr, milk some cows or go out for winter ice cream, I’m sure you’ll find someone to connect with.

    The campaign was just launched today, so it will be interesting to watch the invitation list grow in the coming days.

    (Source: icelandpictures)

  • Oct 8

    You should read this if: a) you like Iceland, b) you like diving.